Monday, January 29, 2007

Terrorism in Pakistan

You know how they say "Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me"? Well, who the fuck should be ashamed if you're fooled three times? We've now had three suicide attacks in less than four days. On Friday, someone blew themselves up outside the Marriot in Islamabad. On Saturday night, the target was a Shia procession in Peshawar, which killed a bunch of policemen who were making security arrangements for it. Today, another suicide bomber killed himself, a civilian and another policeman in Dera Ismail Khan, near where Shias were meant to hold another procession.

A couple of points. First of all, it's almost tragically easy to see these things coming. It's Muharram (for non-Pakistani/non-Muslim readers, the 10th of Muharram is called Ashura, perhaps the most important day of the year for Shias), it's Pakistan, so we're going to get people dying. In fact, the Daily Times actually predicted something like this after the Islamabad attack, asking, "Can the Peshawar government prevent the foretold killings in the province [NWFP] on Ashura?" Well, I guess they have their answer now. Being Shia in Pakistan, especially over the last ten years, has become an increasingly risky business. Though some Shia groups have been responsible for terrorist activity themselves, it is by and large Sunnis who are the perpretrators of sectarian violence and Shias who are the victims.

Second, we all know who's responsible. If it's not Lashkar-e-Jhangvi, it's Jaish-e-Muhammad. If it's not Jaish-e-Muhammad, it's Sipah-e-Sahaba. If it's not Sipah-e-Sahaba, it's Hizb-ul-Mujahideen. These groups have a lot more that unites them than divides them. The same people who kill Pakistani soldiers in Waziristan are the same people who blow themselves in crowds in Karachi who are the same people who target Shias who are the same people who have been waging Jihad in Kashmir for years who are the same people who attempt to assassinate Musharraf. The point to be made is this: we all know about the closet support given to these types of people when they kill American soldiers or fight for "Kashmir's right of self-determination" by Urdu newspaper columnists, Ayaz Amir types (remember, he called Osama a "hero"), and large sections of our political, military, intelligence, and bureaucratic establishments. But what now? Where are their cheerleading statements and columns now? You can't support what they do one day and not the next, simply based on the nationality/skin colour/religion/sect of their victims. Either you think they're "heroes" or "terrorists". There's no in-between. So if you do think they're heroes, then please say so. Don't wait for them to kill Americans; do it now. Say "It is heroic to kill policemen and to target Shias in Muharram". Say it, Ayaz Amir, fucking say it. I can't hear you, you hypocritical fuckwit. Asshole.

14 comments:

Anonymous said...

Rightly Said Ahsan

Rabia said...

this is another one of those posts :) I actually found it while doing a google search for ayaz amir to explain to someone why he makes me so mad.

Ahsan said...

Rabia:

Ah yes, this is one of my favorites. You can really sense my anger in this one.

From now on, I'm just going to rely on you to sift through our archives and find some good ones.

somethingrichandstrange said...

this is one of my favorite fiverupees posts ever.
ahsan raging against the hypocrisy of the pakistani state = so sexy :)

Ahsan said...

My posts have been characterized in many different ways before, but "sexy" has to be a new one, for sure. Though from this angle, I agree that the legs on this one look really good.

M. said...

ayaz amir called bin laden a hero :/

Ahsan said...

M:

Yup, he did. Unfortunately even though I remember reading it, I couldn't locate the exact article he wrote it in, so I couldn't provide a link. But he said it for sure.

Ashwin Ramaswamy said...

very nice post Ahsan..good to have a strong pakistani voice protesting against terrorism in Pakistan..keep posting

R Malik said...

Its too easy to label it as Sunni v Shia. These groups who do this aren't Sunnis, even if they themselves think so. They're Neo-Kharjites, with their very own Hassan Ben Sabah (complete with his very own mountain/cave!!).

Sohaib said...

sir, i dont know what a neo-kharjiite means, but these people pretty much consider themselves to be very strong, very pure and very faithful Sunnis, whether we like them taking over that label or not. :)

R Malik said...

http://www.livingislam.org/n/nkhar_e.html

Hope this helps. Not a big fan of 'Universal sufism' but this article does what it sets out to do, i.e. provide info on Kharijism from beginnings to present day, in a 5 min article. Like I said, these people are NOT Sunni's.

Yawar said...

I actually like what Ayaz Amir writes. His style and not his content. He's known to be an anti-establishmentarianist but if he belives that OBL is a hero and gives facts to support it, then so be it.

Everything does need factual support before it can be said.

PS: I am NOT, I repeat NOT condoning anything that OBL has ever done.

Fatima Quraishi said...

Hey Ahsan,

I just got introduced to your blog via Sameer. I love it! It sounds exactly like you by the way.

About Ayaz Amir: I have decided the man is an anti-establishment opportunist. Some people like him for his consistent stand against the Man but he never adds any suggestions for his critiques which is a complete cop-out.

I look forward to trolling this blog in all my procrastination glory.

--Fatima

Ahsan said...

Fatima:

Well, it turns out Facebook is useful after all. If it can add to the blog readership, then it was worth me joining.

As for Ayaz Amir, the man is an apologist for fascism. An eloquent one no doubt, but one nonetheless.