Wednesday, April 30, 2008

Nawaz Sharif = Nonsensical But Highly Entertaining

Behold! The non-bald Lion of Punjab speaks! All ye mortals, settle down and pay attention! My comments in parentheses.
When told that the deadline set in the Murree Declaration had almost approached as only one day was left, Nawaz said sometimes the work is done in a minute. (I guess we can lay to rest the whole "Rome wasn't built in a day" proverb).

He categorically said the reinstatement of the judges is the most crucial issue facing the people of Pakistan. (Actually, I'm pretty sure the food and electricity crises are the most crucial issues facing the people of Pakistan. Then comes the threat of militancy and terrorism. You've got to put inflation in there too. Now that I think about it, I don't think anyone other than Nawaz Sharif and the Geo Banner Guy care about the judges).

He said price hike afflicting the people was the result of the policies of the previous government.(If you include global climate patterns, and the whole "demand and supply" thing under the rubric of "policies of the previous government").

He said he would meet Zardari at lunch on Wednesday. (Don't forget the jalaybee for dessert!)

He said the third component of the Murree Declaration was that the judges would be restored through a parliamentary resolution. “There is no ambiguity in this regard. We are determined to fully implement the Murree Declaration for the progress of Pakistan. Otherwise, we would remain in the shackles of slavery,” he observed. (Um, ok. I don't even have a snarky comment for this one).

“The people had given mandate to the political parties to get rid of a dictator, who was responsible for poverty, unemployment and lawlessness,” he stated and observed the people were not prepared to forgive a person who bulldozed all institutions including parliament and the judiciary. (Too. Much. Irony. Must. Resist. Temptation.)

6 comments:

zeyd said...

Re: ''Actually, I'm pretty sure the food and electricity crises are the most crucial issues facing the people of Pakistan. Then comes the threat of militancy and terrorism. You've got to put inflation in there too. Now that I think about it, I don't think anyone other than Nawaz Sharif and the Geo Banner Guy care about the judges''


I posted this on PP yesterday:

Don't care. Right now the price of flour is rocketing, electricity bills have gone up 15%, and people can't afford to pay bills. The common man doesn't care about judges; he just wants to feed his family.

SAWJ said...

LOL! Very Nice.

Nawaz Sharif is a big hypocrite. He had the Supreme Court physically attacked on 28th Nov 1997 but is now standing up for the independence of the judiciary just because he hates Musharraf.

And another things is that whatever these people want becomes the solution to everything. They wanted democracy, it was the "solution to everything". Now they want judiciary, it is the "solution to everything".

naqiya said...

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/7373767.stm
for the picture really, more than the article. that transplanted comb-over is priceless.

adeel said...

I distinctly remember him saying that restoring the judges would "solve all of pakistan's problems" at which point I just stared at a tv screen lost for words....

Farooq said...

Ditto with Ahsan, Zeyd and Adeel's comments.

Seriously i dont get this fixation with the fucking judges, man. Its not even amusing to me. WHY is he hung up on this issue, other than any personal anomosity towards Musharraf. It really just dumbfounds me how an entire party can base its agenda on such a non-productive issue! I dont know of any country which attaches its judiciary with the kind of messianic appeal Nawaz is so eager to convey.

onix said...

judicial reforms are actually the very problem here, and perhaps in pakistan. It is basically a matter of interpretation of human rights, and actually constitutions are a tool in this. In that sense sharif could comply. I like the way of thinking in this blog. The obvious impact of worldwide trends on pakistani economy under mush, and the prioritys of the people over the ones of the rulers.
However sharif has good points, both extremism and the general attitudes or mentality of the pakistanis ask for care. If conditional reinstation alienates a large part of the populace (that would be: paired with a lack of efficient (meso-economical) governing), it is not so usefull, and the partys could agree to provisionally reinstate the judges while amending this constitution.